iab-728x90

The Magazine of The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

iab-728x90

June 1999 Audio/Books/Movies/Videos

A U D I O
The Screwtape Letters by C.S. Lewis (Audio Literature) is an unabridged anniversary edition of this religious classic by John Cleese ("Monty Python"). He makes the most of Lewis' rich vein of comedy and satire. These tapes are filled with tart observations on the world, the flesh and the devil.

B O O K S

The Ladder of the Beatitudes (Orbis) by Jim Forest examines these biblical teachings as eight facets of Christian discipleship. Describing these ancient blessings as "part of Jesus' inaugural address," the author notes that they reveal what it is like to be living in the kingdom of God right now.

One Like Jesus: Conversations on the Single Life (Loyola Press) by Debra K. Farrington observes that "the Bible sanctions singleness as a fulfilling and important way of life." Anyone looking for help and encouragement on steering the single course will find spiritual sustenance on these pages. Farrington uses Scripture passages as starting points for 100 brief meditations on such topics as the call to be single, friendship, support groups, E-mail, retreats, pets and reinventing holidays.

M O V I E S

The Red Violin (Lions Gate, not rated at press time) is a beautifully conceived and acted Canadian film that tells the story of an exquisite musical instrument from its creation in 17-century Italy through its journey to the People's Republic of China in the 1960s. The drama reveals the deep emotions elicited by the music emanating from this red violin over the course of five centuries. Here is a movie that is "sense-luscious" in its exploration of the connection between life and art.

My Son the Fanatic (Miramax, R — sexual situations) is a riveting film set in London where an Indian taxi driver discovers he is in deep conflict with his son after the boy embraces Islamic fundamentalism. Here religion, instead of binding people together, keeps them apart.

V I D E O S

Dancing at Lughnasa (Columbia TriStar, PG) revolves around the challenges facing five sisters during summer 1936 in Donegal, Ireland. It's a meditative film that lyrically affirms the small acts of love, courage and kindness that knit a family together in the face of hardship and change. Watch for a totally surprising and exalted moment of grace that arrives on the scene like a shooting star and vanishes as quickly.

The Mighty (Miramax, PG-13 — elements of violence and peril) celebrates the friendship between a 13-year-old giant and a physically deformed youth. Here imagination is the firepower that enables these two outsiders to transcend their disabilities, loneliness and familial problems. The myth of the Knights of the Roundtable inspires them to become all they were meant to be.

The Ladder of the Beatitudes (Orbis) by Jim Forest examines these biblical teachings as eight facets of Christian discipleship. Describing these ancient blessings as "part of Jesus' inaugural address," the author notes that they reveal what it is like to be living in the kingdom of God right now.

One Like Jesus: Conversations on the Single Life (Loyola Press) by Debra K. Farrington observes that "the Bible sanctions singleness as a fulfilling and important way of life." Anyone looking for help and encouragement on steering the single course will find spiritual sustenance on these pages. Farrington uses Scripture passages as starting points for 100 brief meditations on such topics as the call to be single, friendship, support groups, E-mail, retreats, pets and reinventing holidays.

M O V I E S

The Red Violin (Lions Gate, not rated at press time) is a beautifully conceived and acted Canadian film that tells the story of an exquisite musical instrument from its creation in 17-century Italy through its journey to the People's Republic of China in the 1960s. The drama reveals the deep emotions elicited by the music emanating from this red violin over the course of five centuries. Here is a movie that is "sense-luscious" in its exploration of the connection between life and art.

My Son the Fanatic (Miramax, R — sexual situations) is a riveting film set in London where an Indian taxi driver discovers he is in deep conflict with his son after the boy embraces Islamic fundamentalism. Here religion, instead of binding people together, keeps them apart.

V I D E O S

Dancing at Lughnasa (Columbia TriStar, PG) revolves around the challenges facing five sisters during summer 1936 in Donegal, Ireland. It's a meditative film that lyrically affirms the small acts of love, courage and kindness that knit a family together in the face of hardship and change. Watch for a totally surprising and exalted moment of grace that arrives on the scene like a shooting star and vanishes as quickly.

The Mighty (Miramax, PG-13 — elements of violence and peril) celebrates the friendship between a 13-year-old giant and a physically deformed youth. Here imagination is the firepower that enables these two outsiders to transcend their disabilities, loneliness and familial problems. The myth of the Knights of the Roundtable inspires them to become all they were meant to be.

The Red Violin (Lions Gate, not rated at press time) is a beautifully conceived and acted Canadian film that tells the story of an exquisite musical instrument from its creation in 17-century Italy through its journey to the People's Republic of China in the 1960s. The drama reveals the deep emotions elicited by the music emanating from this red violin over the course of five centuries. Here is a movie that is "sense-luscious" in its exploration of the connection between life and art.

My Son the Fanatic (Miramax, R — sexual situations) is a riveting film set in London where an Indian taxi driver discovers he is in deep conflict with his son after the boy embraces Islamic fundamentalism. Here religion, instead of binding people together, keeps them apart.

V I D E O S

Dancing at Lughnasa (Columbia TriStar, PG) revolves around the challenges facing five sisters during summer 1936 in Donegal, Ireland. It's a meditative film that lyrically affirms the small acts of love, courage and kindness that knit a family together in the face of hardship and change. Watch for a totally surprising and exalted moment of grace that arrives on the scene like a shooting star and vanishes as quickly.

The Mighty (Miramax, PG-13 — elements of violence and peril) celebrates the friendship between a 13-year-old giant and a physically deformed youth. Here imagination is the firepower that enables these two outsiders to transcend their disabilities, loneliness and familial problems. The myth of the Knights of the Roundtable inspires them to become all they were meant to be.

Dancing at Lughnasa (Columbia TriStar, PG) revolves around the challenges facing five sisters during summer 1936 in Donegal, Ireland. It's a meditative film that lyrically affirms the small acts of love, courage and kindness that knit a family together in the face of hardship and change. Watch for a totally surprising and exalted moment of grace that arrives on the scene like a shooting star and vanishes as quickly.

The Mighty (Miramax, PG-13 — elements of violence and peril) celebrates the friendship between a 13-year-old giant and a physically deformed youth. Here imagination is the firepower that enables these two outsiders to transcend their disabilities, loneliness and familial problems. The myth of the Knights of the Roundtable inspires them to become all they were meant to be.


Comments



Print subscribers and supporting Web members may comment.

Log in or Subscribe to comment.

text size:

this page: email | print

iab-728x90
December issue

DECEMBER issue:

Advent: Waiting together

More...